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Monday, 24 June 2019

Corocho de Rocigalgo

Walk Summary
After Villuercas and Riscos Altos, Corocho de Rocigalgo is the third P600 that could be done from Camping El Mirador de Cabañeros, though at 121km and 2hrs 20mins Villuercas might be a bit of a stretch.
Corocho de Rocigalgo was also the second consecutive walk where the planned start point identified from the map turned out to be unsuitable. However this time I was told of a better alternative and even given another copy of Senderos Autoguiados (self-guided trail) by the helpful reception staff at campsite.
I had already seen this and discounted it because I thought my route from the NE using the Camino del Francés was better!
It certainly was shorter than the 21km of the self-guided trail, but on arriving at the planned start point at 39.5621°N, 4.5782°W NE of summit, it was obvious the track had not been used by a vehicle in many years and the caminho beyond the rusty gate, despite it's status of having a name, the amount of vegetation growing on the track suggested it may well quickly become a bushwhack in proportions of Riscos Altos that I did not want to repeat in a hurry.
Area Recreativa Las Becerras, 3km to required car park
Should have listened to the locals and saved myself a 60km drive, now got to drive a further 50km round to the other side of the mountain. 
About an hour later I was leaving the CM4155 and joining the Camino de las Becerras.  Only a dirt track but in much better condition than others I have driven on with national road signs and even more encouraging was the car park sign at Area Recreativa Las Becerras after 2km. A sign for another car park pointed the way I needed to be 3km away, where I found an information booth, covered parking and a locked gate indicating time to start walking.
At 2pm it was about the hottest part of the day, not the best time to be setting off but at least there was plenty of daylight to complete the 6½ hours suggested time, plus I had 5l of water in my backpack.
Turn right at 2nd sign to gain ridge.
Straight on is up Arroyo del Chorro
The guide suggested a circular route, however it's lack of orientation and other land marks made it difficult to transpose to the map. My plan was to gain the ridge from Tejadillas and follow it round over various summits and Collado del Chorro to Corocho de Rocigalgo then return by the same route. Now I have done this route I can see this was not one of the routes from the guide, but it worked for me providing 3 extra peaks to bag on way to main P600 summit, it is in fact named Caminho de la Arañosa.
Starting from covered parking just past information booth at 39.5748°N, 4.6601°W, following track to bridge over Arroyo de la Arañosa it looked like I would be following the guided route, however after the 2nd sign the guided route suggested straight on up Arroyo del Chorro, mine said turn right. Sticking with my route I followed the track to where it finished on the map and indeed disappeared on the ground at 39.5473°N, 4.6581°W.
Tejadillas 1397m spot height and trig pillar
The path promised on the map did not appear so I drifted left through oak woods and found a track that would take me round the NE side of both the 1248m and 1278m spot heights. Once again this track disappeared but this time with a combination of following occasional small piles of stones and checking map I found a route on to main ridge at 1265m saddle. Turning left here and following ridge line over relatively easy ground you eventually reach the first summit and trig pillar at Tejadillas.
It had taken 2½ hours to get this far, consuming nearly half of my water, from here you can see the next two summits and further round to the left, preceded  by more descent than I would have liked, the main objective of the day - Corocho de Rocigalgo, still a long way to go.
Still open country with no discernible path, but still relatively straight forward to the next summit of Risco de Juan Antón.
 Finger post at Collado del Chorro, summit  25mins away.
A path then appears taking you past the highest point on the ridge and the nameless 1419m spot height. A short diversion off track to bag the summit then back on path and descent to Collado del Chorro, probably the furthest point you are likely to be from start point and also where you would appear if you followed the guide route up Arroyo del Chorro. 3½ hours after setting off and feeling effects of walking in heat, one redeeming feature was sign said Al Rocigalgo, 25mins. Well that depends on how fast you walk. Final ascent felt really hard work and seemed to go on for ever, but after 20 minutes I was at Mirador de Rocigalgo looking at summit 30m away, so maybe not as tired as I think.
Following summit rituals return to Mirador and sign giving choice of return via Ruta del Chorro or Ruta del Rocigalgo. Even though the latter was 11km, 3hrs 05mins as opposed to 9km, 2hrs 20mins I chose the longer option. From the map this route promised decent tracks whereas I did not want to go back the way I had ascended, though I now know I could have descended down Arroyo del Churro.
Numbers refer to POI's on Senderos Autoguiados
On the way down I spotted numbered red markers which initially I thought where distance markers, quickly discovering the first with No7 I thought I was on to a winner, but I later realised these numbers referred to points of interest on the guide map and the 11km finger post was in fact correct.
As it turned out there was a decent track all the way down and it only took me 2½ hours. For a more straight forward ascent I would recommend this route for anyone who just wants to bag the P600, maybe even making it a circular walk and descend down Arroyo del Churro.
Anyway after nearly 7 hours and over 21km with more than 1150m of ascent feeling shattered but well pleased, I was back at the van swallowing my last mouthful of water using what seemed to be my last ounce of energy. Amazing how you can husband your resources to complete the route. Just as well it was not 22km.

Walk Statistics
Walk Date - 24 June 2019
Walkers - Steve 
Smith
Start Point - Information boards and covered parking 5km from CV-4155 along Camino de las Becerras (39.57478°N, 4.66011°W)
Start Time - 13:55
Finish Point - Information boards and covered parking 5km from CV-4155 along Camino de las Becerras (39.57478°N, 4.66011°W)
Finish Time- 20:47
Total Duration - 6hrs 52mins 
Overall Average pace - 1.91mph
Total Distance Walked - 13.12 miles
Total Height Ascended - 1158.00metres

Peaks visited
Spain/Portugal 600m Prominence Peaks (168S - 185S&P - 2165E)
Corocho de Rocigalgo (60S - 62S&P - 91E)
Spain/Portugal 300m - 599m Prominence Peaks (1000+)
NONE
Spain/Portugal 150m - 299m Prominence Peaks (3000+)
NONE
Spain Autonomous Community High Points (19)
NONE
Spain Province High Points (52)
Corocho de Rocigalgo (11)
S: Spain
P: Portugal
E:Europe

Final walk from previous trip
2019
February
Other walks on this trip
2019
May
15th Peñarroya
June
17th Serra de São Mamede
18th Villuercas
19th Riscos Altos
24th Corocho de Rocigalgo
27th Riscos del Amor

Route
Map of route to follow

More Photographs
Full set of captioned photos providing journal and description of key parts of ascent, descent and summit photographs.
Route map, Statistics and other route info to follow. 
Senderos autoguiados - Senda del macizo del Rocigalgo. Self guided trails - Path of the Rocigalgo massif
https://www.reservasparquesnacionales.es/real/parquesnac/admin/documentos/Folleto5-Rocigalgo.pdf 

Wednesday, 19 June 2019

Riscos Altos


Walk Summary
Struggling to remember a tougher P600 in Spain. Cerro del Cabezo comes to mind, notwithstanding recollections being more recent, today's bushwhack felt far tougher over a much greater distance.
Not life threatening in the way Mickle Fell turned out back in February 2010, after all I did not have hypothermia to deal with here.

Am sure remember sign said "Prohibido el Paso".
Not sure "Private Hunting" sign means the same,
but hey - the gate is locked anyway.
The day did not start well when all three possible start points selected from the map along the CM-4100 as part of route planning turned out to be unsuitable.
Two of them at 39.54073°N, 5.12098°W and 39.54585°N, 5.12077°W rekindled memories of Carascoy with locked gates across the tracks and the ubiquitous "Prohibido el paso" signs discouraging me from climbing over them. Have to respect trespass laws in Spain or any foreign country, especially as unknown if owners can use unprovoked force to discourage further progress.
The third at 39.55971°N, 5.12431°W was accessible but the only place to park near the main road would have blocked access to the track, plus it was too potholed for me to risk taking the van.
Thinking on the hoof I next drove to Mohedas de la Jara. Starting from here would have put several Km on to the days 10km planned route so I explored a couple of tracks to get closer to the summit, with a plan to wild camp overnight either before or after bagging Riscos Altos. After 2km the track became impossible to drive in a road vehicle, so next idea was to find a hostel In Mohedas de la Jara and bite the bullet next day for a long hike.
No hostel. Just a farmacia, a bank, two bars and about 5 churches.
By now it had crossed my kind I may not bag Riscos Altos this trip, especially after driving back south along the CM-4100 confirming original planned trailhead were non-starters.
However that thought did not last long. Just before the 45Km marker post there is a sign for a picnic area in 3 Km. I have a plan. Wild camp in car park and set off first thing in the morning.
The car park was fine, in fact it was opposite one of the tracks I had explored earlier but could only manage a couple of hundred metres in the van. The one problem with the car park was it was directly below crackling HV power lines. That was enough for me, I was not going to spend the rest of the day and all night under that. It is only 2:30pm, there is plenty of daylight to do it now even with the extra 4Km each way. Several tracks would bring me out at Casa de las Nacientes close to the original planned route.
The first right fork at 39.53548°N, 5.12000°W looked like the most direct route but the next fork at 39.53596°N, 5.12106°W no longer existed. There were traces but it was long overgrown and trying to find a way round only brought me to a dead end and thick vegetation frustratingly close to a path I would use later.
So after thirty wasted minutes I headed back to the first fork near the start and continued along what I hoped would be the main track. Overall this was fine with only one long ago fallen tree blocking track at 39.53558°N, 5.12629°W. It has been some time since any vehicle had been past this point, but a short bushwhack around the tree picked up another path about 30m away leading to a derelict farm building at 39.54399°N, 5.12446°W. Tuning left here brought me to Casa de las Nacientes where a right turn and then a left after crossing Arroyo del Cubilar put me on the planned route for the first time.
Turning right and again crossing Arroyo del Cubilar a steep track ascending 330m in just over 1km takes you to the summit ridge and saddle at 39.54889°N, 5.14565°W. From here the track becomes a path and heads left away from Riscos Altos. To the right there is no path, lots of vegetation and two minor summits, including a bonus trig pillar on Risco de las Morras, if you stick with the summit ridge and the boundary between “las comunicades autónomas” of Extremadura and Castilla-La Mancha.
By now it was 5pm (the time I had originally planned to be back at the van) so after a quick text home I put on gaiters and T-shirt before heading through thick knee deep bushes with sticky leaves and a hint of smelling similar to Rosemary. There did seem to be some tracks to follow but in all honesty I think they were animal tracks.
The route I took was the route I took. I can’t claim it to be the best, I just stayed left of the ridge with the sticky leaves or right with mostly small oak and juvenile saplings. Significantly not bagging either of the minor peaks including the trig on Riscos de las Morras. At the final col I surveyed my right picking out tracks and landmarks to identify them on the map, finally dropping a waypoint at 39.56463°N, 5.16596°W to avoid the bushwhack I had just had on the ascent.
From here I could also see Riscos Altos 1.2km away preceded by two ribs of rock and slightly less dense undergrowth. Sticking to the right and using the base of the ribs to avoid more bushwhacking I eventually ended up 40m below the summit and 60m away with a crag directly in front of me that showed one weakness. So off I go after stashing trek poles straight for it.
Quite a difficult scramble/climb for me made harder by my quads losing some strength since my last major hike back in February up Pico de Mijas, plus after five weeks on the road, beach and around swimming pools. Not to mention the odd bar, meant footholds became knee holds in places and aerobic strength struggling to make up for lack of muscle strength. I was also dog tired after the days hike so far. Suffice it to say - I made it, but it was one of those scrambles you commit to leaving only one way to go - Up.
Lying on my back exhausted at the top I still could not see the summit or trig pillar to the NW, but I could see an easier way up to the SE. Well that’s the descent route sorted. Past the next rock the trig pillar came in to view midway along a short arête.
After photos taken from both sides I sat on the trig pillar feeling exhausted but well satisfied and pleased with myself. I would have liked an easier time for only the 3rd P600 of the trip, especially as the first, Serra de Sãu Mamede, was virtually a drive up. But sometimes you are where you are and just have to get on with it.
Refuelling on energy bars, nuts, an apple would have been nice and eeking out the 1litre of water I had left from the 3litre I set off with, I sat in the sun in shorts and T-shirt at 7pm thinking how great this peak bagging malarkey is and how good it is to be able to do it. At the same time thinking it has taken me 4 hours to get here to spend just 15 minutes on the summit only to head back from whence I had come. Can’t explain why, just great to be able to do it. Just wish I could share it more often at a less extreme level with Gina.
Surveying alternate descent route from Riscos Altos summit.
Can see reservoir to aim for lower centre right
Taking the easy route off the summit I soon returned to the ascent route. Aiming for the col I noted earlier I actually dropped below the ascent route, there is not really a path, and came across a boulder scree that took me down to one of the higher tracks but went in the opposite direction I needed to go. From the top of the scree I could see a couple of reservoirs which I located on the map and an unmapped track/clearing in vegetation west of Arroyo de la Huesa leading to a mapped track and reservoir I could see. From there it would be just over 6km back to van mostly along the CM-4100.
Crossing the track at bottom of boulder scree, 39.57030°N, 5.16611°W, I headed down and east through small oaks and saplings that soon became thicker forcing me further east until I hit tall broom and more of the thick sticky rosemary smelly vegetation but much larger than I had encountered before. Becoming consumed by finding a route I ended up heading towards the gully of Arroyo de la Huesa too far east and closer to an alternate track further to the east at 39.57076°N, 5.15991°W. Problem was that vegetation was getting thicker and all options east seemed impossible driving me deeper down the Arroyo gully. The turning point was after checking map I was 210m away from track after being only 150m away last time I checked, but the ultimate insult getting bushwhacked to a standstill. In an effort to break a way through lost my balance and ended up falling down a 30° slope. All of 2 metres, finishing upside down wedged in a mass of undergrowth.
Feeling somewhat demorilised I started to wonder what would happen if I could not make further progress.

Head back upwards and rejoin the ascent route?
That would take ages, even if I had the energy.
I then started to think about an old squash friend who went for a walk from his house in France before picking up family from the airport. The family never met him, so making their own way to the house, found it open with car keys and wallet on the table. He was found two years later, or his bones were.
Anyway soon put that out of my mind and determined to head direct to track on map come what may, even on hands and knees. Scratched to buggery but eventually got to track which was still pretty overgrown and had a massive gully down the middle where water had found an easier path down the mountain. It was here I noticed my hat was missing as well as my glasses, they must have come off during my fall. Had them to see map and work out was 210m from track after being only 150m when I last looked. Must have lost them when I fell over. That's where they will stay for posterity. Don't think anyone will end up there again. I certainly was not going back for them.
¾hr to the road including a stop near reservoir that I had spotted from the start of descent. Time to relax and 5k plod along CM-4100 back to picnic area and van. Just keep putting one foot in front of the other, which was basically what I had been telling myself all the way down. The only jeopardy now remaining was avoiding the one car that passed me going in the same direction on the opposite side of the road.
Looking back at sunset beyond Riscos Altos summit
from CV-4100.Still an hour to get back to van
Back at van at the unbelievable time of 11pm, should have guessed really sunset an hour ago should have been a clue and it was pitch dark. How time flies when you are having “fun”.

All that remained was a 70km drive to Camping El Mirador de Cabañeros. Arriving well after midnight I anticipated parking outside on the road but had the good fortune to find the main gate open and even better being allowed by the friendly staff to bunk down, in their car park, ready for early arrival and set up the next day. Was even offered use of showers but given the time all I was interested in was filling up my water bottles, re-hydrating , setting up my bed and getting my head down.
I am finishing writing this up seven days later and having now climbed Corocho de Rocigalgo it is possible to use here as a base for all three P600s, Villuercas, Riscos Altos and of course Corocho de Rocigalgo.


Walk Statistics
Walk Date - 19 June 2019
Walkers - Steve Smith
Start Point - Picnic area close to 48km marker on CV-4100 (39.53610°N, 5.11914°W)
Start Time - 14:41
Finish Point - Picnic area close to 48km marker on CV-4100 (39.53610°N, 5.11914°W)
Finish Time- 22:42
Total Duration - 8hrs 01mins 
Overall Average pace - 1.44mph
Total Distance Walked - 11.58 miles
Total Height Ascended -928.00metres

Peaks visited
Spain/Portugal 600m Prominence Peaks (168S - 185S&P - 2165E)
Riscos Altos (59S - 61S&P - 90E)
Spain/Portugal 300m - 599m Prominence Peaks (1000+)
NONE
Spain/Portugal 150m - 299m Prominence Peaks (3000+)
NONE
Spain Autonomous Community High Points (19)
NONE
Spain Province High Points (52)
NONE
S: Spain
P: Portugal
E:Europe

Final walk from previous trip
2019
February
Other walks on this trip
2019
May
15th Peñarroya
June
17th Serra de São Mamede
18th Villuercas
19th Riscos Altos
24th Corocho de Rocigalgo
27th Riscos del Amor

Route
Map of route to follow

More Photographs
Full set of captioned photos providing journal and description of key parts of ascent, descent and summit photographs.
Route map, Statistics and other route info to follow. 
3km bushwhack early on after leaving saddle.
The first summit is the 1202m spot height,
beyond that is Risco de las Moras with trig pillar then 2.0Km beyond is Riscos Altos
Click on photograph to view slide-show (NOT YET)

Tuesday, 18 June 2019

Villuercas


Walk Summary
A late 10pm arrival at Camping Monfrague, following last minute decision to leave Portugals Serras Estrela and Guardunha due to rain forecast for next 2-3 day and head for Spain, I was tempted to spend the Tuesday here having been made to feel very comfortable and welcome by reception staff despite the late hour, but need to get some walks in after yesterdays drive ups and 5 weeks sitting on beach or round villa pools.
Managed an early, by my recent standards, 09:45am start with the 1½ hour drive to the CC-97 just south of the mountain village of Navexuelas.
The plan was to park on the CC-97 and walk the 6km or 7km up the service road to radio station and what I later discover abandoned military base on the summit. But despite there being some semblance of suitable parking the concrete track with nation road signs warning of bends and a 20km speed limit was just too tempting to not use.
I felt sure there would be a car park at the end of what I expected to be a short drive, but as the track switched back and forth gaining altitude, i was starting to feel guilty about another drive up and missing out on a desperately needed introductory walk to start putting some miles back in my legs.
The concrete track did finally give way to a potholed track on a T junction at Collado de Ballesteros. Road works signs, the sound of heavy machinery and actually wanting to walk up a hill convinced me to park up and walk the final 2½ km following the right track from junction to the summit.
Setting off with just water in my backpack I soon passed the road works which turned out to be a single machine crushing stone just off the last switchback,from where I could see to the left radio masts, military base and trig pillar perched upon a lofty crag.
The track continued around the back of the crag, stopping short a good 40m below the summit. Straight ahead was a large crag behind a communications building with just one weakness overgrown with spiky bushes. Looking round the left side did not reveal an easier option, in fact without rope it looked impossible. Returning to the comms building I realised the main summit ahead on a more accessible crag surmounted by more more masts and buildings obviating the need to go up this crag.
Navigating through boulder strewn undergrowth and gentle uneven ascent brought me to the base of the crag and a choice of strata at about 40° incline to ascend before the final scramble up to a lookout post and summit plateau with trig pillar the other side of a helipad presumably used to bring up materials and men to build the military base and later the communications facilities.
The trig pillar is on the 1595m spot height and further to the NNE the map shows a second trig pillar (Villuercas 2) beyond the military station. Well whilst I am up here might as well go look at it.
Descending the other side of the helipad brings you to the military boundary fence, much in need of repair. Turns out the base is ab abandoned so can proceed without fear of arrest, or worse. A little more scrambling brings you to another shelter from where you can see the next corner along the fence atop of a gentle scree and another scramble beyond. At least from here I could see the corner of the base around which would be the trig pillar. But before that there was a vertical climb down to a steep loose scree slope with another difficult scramble beyond. At this point I wrongly expected to have sight of the pillar and decided it was not worth the trouble for what would at best have been a bolt similar to that found on Mortillano last year. Seems use of trig symbol on Spanish maps does not necessarily indicate a physical pillar. At the end of the day I am a hill bagger not a trig bagger  and I had already claimed the summit. Or so I thought.
Returning to the helipad I saw a large boulder on the NE cornerthat looked higher than the trig. Closer inspection suggests to me it is higher, but difficult to say without any survey kit. Visiting it and photographing trig pillar from atop of the boulder ensures I will still be able to claim the summit.
After this it was time to return to van via ascent route - reverse scramble back to service track then back to van by 2pm and maybe time to go on to second P600 of day, Riscos Altos just 50km away.
Turns out although it is reasonably close is a 2 hour drive along narrow winding mountain roads so after filling up with diesal near Cañamero I decided to stop at Camping Villuercas 18km away near Guadalupe. 

Just grass pitches with electricity with a choice of total sun or total shade, I chose sun. Only €10 per night with clean toilets and lots of hot water, representing excellent value. Not to mention the typical Spanish restaurant attached serving a 'Menu del Dia' for €8 including wine. I had green beans in tomatoe to start, Spicy lamb for main and flan for desert. Delicious.
Besides the excellent value, given problems experienced next day on Riscos Altos it was definitely the right decision to stop the night at Camping Villuercas.
I was even tempted to stay another day to sample other Menu del Dia options, but I am here for peak bagging, not sitting around all day in the sun.
Given the nearby town of Guadalupe with the Santuàrio de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe and well labelled low level Caminho Villuercas nearby may well be worth a return if ever passing this way again with Gina


Walk Statistics
Walk Date - 18 June 2019
Walkers - Steve Smith
Accommodation - Camping Monfrague 
Start Point - Edge of service road to radio station at end of concrete track off CC-97 (39.47452°N, 5.40500°W)
Start Time - 11:51
Finish Point - Edge of service road to radio station at end of concrete track off CC-97 (39.47452°N, 5.40500°W)
Finish Time- 13:32
Total Duration - 1hrs 41mins 
Overall Average pace - 1.909mph
Total Distance Walked - 3.19 miles
Total Height Ascended - 186.00metres

Peaks visited
Spain/Portugal 600m Prominence Peaks (168S - 185S&P - 2165E)
Villuerca (58S - 60S&P - 89E)
Spain/Portugal 300m - 599m Prominence Peaks (1000+)
NONE
Spain/Portugal 150m - 299m Prominence Peaks (3000+)
NONE
Spain Autonomous Community High Points (19)
NONE
Spain Province High Points (52)
NONE
S: Spain
P: Portugal
E:Europe

Final walk from previous trip
2019
February
Other walks on this trip
2019
May
15th Peñarroya
June
17th Serra de São Mamede
18th Villuercas
19th Riscos Altos
24th Corocho de Rocigalgo
27th Riscos del Amor

Route
Map of route to follow

More Photographs
Full set of captioned photos providing journal and description of key parts of ascent, descent and summit photographs.
Route map, Statistics and other route info to follow. 

Wednesday, 15 May 2019

Peñarroya


Walk Summary
First thought was had driven right up to the summit
Only a small 50km detour on drive along from Zaragoza to Calpe. Leave the A23 north of Teruel at junction 116 following the A226 to Cedillas, ignoring SatNav turn right on the very minor road TE-V-8024 to Alcalá de la Selva, finally taking the road to Estación Invernal de Valdelinares and continuing to Collado de la Gitano where you can leave the tarmac road and follow a stone track almost all the way to the summit. 
In fact coming to the end of the track there is an old worn stone pillar that you may think is the summit marker but approx 50m to the SSE is a trig pillar on a top of a stone tower that is first accessed by stone steps and finally metal steps built in to the stone giving access to the trig pillar.
Half way up trig tower in flip-flops
I withstood a bollocking from the wife for climbing them in my flip flops and as I reached the top could hear more voices so decided to come straight down in case it was Ranger Rick.
Turns out it was a group of 19 hikers who had walked 16km to reach the same point we had driven to. Presumably they had 16km to walk back. Have to say I felt somewhat guilty for about half a second but was tempered by completing the three isolated P600's around Teruel that I had passed several times on our drive to Valencia and the Costas.
Gina's 4th Spanish P600 and her highest peak reached on foot albeit only involved a 50m hike.
Returned to the A23 at junction 75 via Mora de Rubielos
Walk Statistics
Walk Date - 15 May 2019
Walkers - Steve Smith, Gina Smith
Accommodation - Camping Calp-Mar, Calpe 
Start Point - End of stone track near stone pillar (40.39056°N, 0.66528°W)
Start Time - 13:43
Finish Point - End of stone track near stone pillar (40.39056°N, 0.66528°W)
Finish Time- 14:04
Total Duration - 0hrs 21mins 
Overall Average pace - 0.29mph
Total Distance Walked - 0.10 miles
Total Height Ascended -1.00metres

Peaks visited
Spain/Portugal 600m Prominence Peaks (168S - 185S&P - 2165E)
Peñarroya (57S - 58S&P - 87E)
Spain/Portugal 300m - 599m Prominence Peaks (1000+)
NONE
Spain/Portugal 150m - 299m Prominence Peaks (3000+)
NONE
Spain Autonomous Community High Points (19)
NONE
Spain Province High Points (52)
Peñarroya (10)
S: Spain
P: Portugal
E:Europe

Final walk from previous trip
2019
February
Other walks on this trip
2019
May
15th Peñarroya
June
17th Serra de São Mamede
18th Villuercas
19th Riscos Altos
24th Corocho de Rocigalgo
27th Riscos del Amor

Route
Map of route to follow

More Photographs
Full set of captioned photos providing journal and description of key parts of ascent, descent and summit photographs.
Route map, Statistics and other route info to follow. 
Group of 19 hikers walked 16km to reach the summit. Did not make me feel guilty
Click on photograph to view slide-show

Monday, 25 February 2019

Pico de Mijas


Walk Statistics
Walk Date - 25 February 2019
Walkers - Steve Smith
Start Point - Layby off A-387 near Casa de los Condes (36.60213°N, 4.67322°W)
Start Time - 13:51
Finish Point - Layby off A-387 near Casa de los Condes (36.60213°N, 4.67322°W)
Finish Time- 17:07
Total Duration - 3hrs 26mins 
Overall Average pace - 1.76mph
Total Distance Walked - 6.05 miles
Total Height Ascended -750.00metres

Peaks visited
Spain/Portugal 600m Prominence Peaks (168S - 185S&P - 2165E)
Pico de Mijas (56S - 57S&P - 86E)
Spain/Portugal 300m - 599m Prominence Peaks (1000+)
NONE
Spain/Portugal 150m - 299m Prominence Peaks (3000+)
NONE
Spain Autonomous Community High Points (19)
NONE
Spain Province High Points (52)
NONE
S: Spain
P: Portugal
E:Europe

Final walk from previous trip
2018
October
Other walks on this trip
2019
January
14th The Seven NW French Department High Points of the Brest Peninsular
17th Ernio
18th Erlo
19th Udalaitz
21st Anboto
23rd Tossal de la Baltasana
24th Sierra de Montsià
27th La Creu de Santos
30th Mattagalls
31th Serrat Negra
February
01st Tossa d'Alp
03rd Cap de Gallina Pelada
05th Penyal d'Ifach
06th Sierra d'Olta
09th Cerro de la Selva & Morrón del Rivazuelo
10th Cerro Espuña
11th Carrascoy
12th Colativí
12th Cerrode Mesquita
16th Morrón de Mariné
17th Sierra de Lujar
18th Cerro de Santa Lucía
20th Maroma
25th Pico de Mijas


First walk from next trip
2019
May

15th Peñarroya

Route


More Photographs
Full set of captioned photos providing journal and description of key parts of ascent, descent and summit photographs.
Path contours around towards Pico de Mijas summit about 1km away
Click on photograph to view slide-show